Thursday, November 19, 2009

Gaslight Alley Revisited

Currently I'm working in Mayfair, an exorbitantly over-priced area in the West End of London. Not far from my location is an abandoned Underground station at Down Street, closed in the 1920s because of lack of custom - even then the inhabitants were too well-heeled to contemplate travelling on a public transport system.

I was going to initiate a diatribe against the parasites on society who live here with their personalised car number plates and private clubs but I can't be bothered. People sponge off society at both ends of the spectrum and that will never change so I'll not waste my breath.

Despite the fact that I'm working to past two in the morning, I've still found time to visit some of the attractions of the big city. Yesterday I went to the Tate Britain to reacquaint myself with the highlights of late eighteenth and nineteenth century British Art, a period when the craft of the artist was paramount.

Today I visited Tate Modern. It was a brief visit and, as in past visits, I searched in vain for something that was more than 'The Emporer's New Clothes' and something that demonstrates the craft skills of the artist.
Still I'm sure there are enough people living in Mayfair with money to waste who can keep these modern paint daubers in the substances of their choice.


Anyway, just to emphasis how essential light is to a subject, be it in painting or photography, I revisited the small square with the gaslight that I photographed at night recently. Not too exciting now, it is? Where's the atmosphere and the drama? It's as flat as the proverbial pancake.

10 comments:

Lee said...

Or, to quote my dear wife, 'as flat as a dodo'.

Pauline said...

Had we not seen the previous post, we would have been deluded into thinking, how interesting - an unlit gaslight! You spoiled us, however.

I would not have gone in the darkened alley without a drawn sword - pity the fellow whose weapon was still sheathed.

Canbush said...

A flat dodo?

Indeed, Pauline, it's not that inviting in the daylight although the buildings are quaint. The wooden panelling forms the side wall of a very old wine merchant so you should be able to get a shot of a reviving spirit in the event of a shock.

Canbush said...

Obviously the wine merchant's shop is panelled - I didn't have the chance to see if the man himself was also.

Pauline said...

a panelled wine merchant would be shock enough!

Lee said...

✫✫✫ MERRY CHRISTMAS ✫✫✫

天氣晴朗 said...

有空我一定會常來逛你的部落格!!!! ..............................

打扮 said...

覺得自己能不能做到,其實只在一念之間。........................................

建霖 said...

A stitch in time saves nine. ....................................................

Colleen said...

Nice photos.


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